Online educational resource on achieving indoor environmental quality with radiant based HVAC systems
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The importance of IEQ at the Heating Café
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Its ruff ruff without radiant heatingMy trusted website developer from WebworX insisted we call this the “heating café”…a place where we can throw out quotes on indoor environmental quality for people to ponder while they sip their evening tea or morning coffee.

I thought the dog house was more appropriate given that the Home Comfort Survey™ tells us only 50% of Home Owner's are happy with their comfort systems…

Ruff, Ruff


So people - ponder these quotes to start or end your day ...


“…a rational calculation of heating and air-conditioning systems must begin with the conditions for comfort…”
Prof. P.O. Fanger


"...to deny or ignore the psychology involved in comfort measurements is not only shortsighted, but treats the human subject as a machine, which it is not."
Prof. F. Rohles


"...design is about meeting real human needs and not just creating attractive or dramatic surroundings."
Anita Baltimore, FASID


"The absence or presence of heat is one of the primary environmental factors affecting human comfort. We pay enormous attention to the five main sensory organs in our bodies, yet often overlook our true sixth sense, thermal sensitivity." Andrew Marsh Ph D, B. Arch. (Hon)


“The quality of housing conditions plays a decisive role in the health status of the residents, because many health problems are either directly or indirectly related to the building itself, the construction materials that were used, and the equipment or the size or structure of the individual dwellings.”
The World Health Organization


“So how does a well-designed environment take on a care giving task? How does it "relieve" us of our daily stresses or, in a more compromised state, actually facilitate the healing process? Those of us in health care design have been talking about "healing environments" ever since the first Symposium on Healthcare Design in 1988. Back then, we were "institutional designers" who knew we could make a difference in the quality of patients' lives by providing better environments in which to receive care.”
Rosalyn Cama, FASID


"We do not seem to recognize that our real customer is the occupant, not the building."
H.F. Levy, P.E.


"Our environmental preferences are based on value judgments which are learned through past experiences and influenced by our background and social-economic level and age is an important catalyst."
F. Rohles,Jr., Ph.D.


"....the perfect heating and cooling system would be based principally on human comfort factors."
Michael McDonough Architect


"We don't have words for high-quality space. We don't have words for anything other than quantities. Realtors have a real challenge on their hands because if they're trying to say, 'This is a cool house,' they have to use words like spacious, and if you can say high ceilings, it sounds better. Or cathedral ceiling-that sounds pretty cool. But when you say cozy, it's a euphemism for too small. And there is nothing in-between. So what I am trying to do is develop some words that help people to understand that there is more to a house than just size."
Sarah Susanka Architect


"Homeostasis (thermal regulation) is essential for the maintenance of health and its breakdown results in disease."
Faculty of Health Sciences University of Sydney


"Working environments, which are inadequately designed from the building physical point of view (acoustics, indoor climate, lighting, air quality), have an impact on health, thermal comfort and performance."
The Fraunhofer Institute


"The built environment has direct and indirect effects on mental health."
Dr. G. Evans, Departments of Design and Environmental Analysis and Human Development Cornell University


"When measuring the thermal indoor climate, it is important to remember that man does not feel the room temperature, he feels the heat loss from the body. The parameters that must be measured are those which affect the energy loss, namely: Air Temperature, Mean Radiant Temperature, Air Velocity and Humidity. The influence of these parameters on energy loss is not equal and it is not sufficient to measure only one of them."
INNOVA


“To have a home is more than the mere fact of having a roof above one's head. It is having a house (a place for oneself), a place which protects privacy, contributes to physical and psychological well being, contributes to the development and social integration of its inhabitants - a central place for human life.” World Health Organization


"...the judgment of comfort is a cognitive process involving many inputs influenced by physical, physiological, psychological, and other processes."
ASHRAE Handbooks


"…the careful regulation of body temperature is critical to comfort and health." ASHRAE Handbooks 


"Extremes of heat and cold environmental conditions can be very detrimental to the health and comfort of humans as our bodies attempt to maintain a state of homeothermy at a core temperature of about 37 deg. C (98.6 deg. F). When we are exposed to extremes of heat and cold, our bodies have natural reactions to the extreme conditions."
Dr. Keith C. Heidorn


“We need to make sure that, when we select and begin design;in fact, when we think about sites,. . . we’re starting to think about the HVAC and the comfort of the people inside of the building.”
Robert A. Peck, Commissioner, Public Buildings Service
 


Over the 20-year life cycle of a prototypical 100,000 sf building, 5% of the cost is spent on design and construction, 10% on o & m, and 85% on salaries of personnel working in the building. Even a 1% increase in productivity would increase the bottom line exponentially.
Summary report of the national workshops on Design Excellence in HVAC for Federal Buildings


Lessons learned from post-occupancy evaluations indicate that HVAC systems elicit the most complaints from tenants, yet HVAC technology, equipment and designs exist to produce a high rate of satisfaction. The challenge is to recognize and apply what we’ve learned when we design HVAC systems for our buildings.
Summary report of the national workshops on Design Excellence in HVAC for Federal Buildings

Her Home Magazine is Awesome!

Click Here to Read More About Women in the Construction Industry


For Consumers Concerned About Comfort and Contracting

How does world famous designer IDEO create such great products -
"...they borrow from anthropology, psychology, biomechanics, and other disciplines -- for putting humans at the center of the design process."

Now there's a thought...putting people at the center of the design process!

Why didn't the male dominated home building industry think of that?

Do you really need the answer?


"We don't have words for high-quality space. We don't have words for anything other than quantities. Realtors have a real challenge on their hands because if they're trying to say, 'This is a cool house,' they have to use words like spacious, and if you can say high ceilings, it sounds better. Or cathedral ceiling-that sounds pretty cool. But when you say cozy, it's a euphemism for too small. And there is nothing in-between. So what I am trying to do is develop some words that help people to understand that there is more to a house than just size."
Sarah Susanka, Architect 


"...there is relatively strong evidence that characteristics of buildings and indoor environments significantly influence the occurrence of communicable respiratory illness, allergy and asthma symptoms, sick building symptoms, and worker performance. Theoretical and empirical evidence indicate that existing technologies and procedures can improve indoor environments in a manner that increases health and productivity."

Review of Health and Productivity Gains From Better IEQ, William J. Fisk,  Indoor Environment Department, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA


"Doing nothing, is not the correct answer when the question is how can we make a difference."
Paul Verhesen,
President, Clark Builders

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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